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Our Mission

At Brookesmith Special Utility District, we are committed to providing safe, high quality water services to our customers, while maintaining a standard of excellence in customer service and environmental conservation.

Bill Payment Options

Looking for the most convenient way to pay your bill? We offer a wide variety of payment options to our customers. Drop your payment by our office, pay your bill online thru our website, call our automated phone line (325)203-4041  or  Mail it to: PO Box 27 Brownwood, TX 76804  See all the different payment options that we offer ... Learn more...

Texas 811 Know what's below. Call before you dig.

Our water system is our biggest asset.  Help us to better help you by calling before you dig. Need to build a fence, put in a driveway, plant trees, etc. Please call us, send us an email or call Texas 811 to have us locate our water lines before you dig.  Click here to let us know.

Recent News

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Rate Increase

Due to the recent rate change from BCWID, we are having to raise our rates from the current $5.55/1,000 gallons to $5.65/1,000 gallons. This will be effective for the billing period starting 10/15/17 for the bill due 12/10/17. You may go to our website at www.brookesmithwater.com to view the rate changes, come into our office or call us at 3250646-5731 if you have any questions

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50 Inches of Rain

50 Inches of Rain

Hurricane Harvey, now downgraded to tropical depression Harvey, dumped 50 inches of rain on parts of the Texas coast this week. This epic storm has wreaked havoc on a large swath of the southwest and left destruction and devastation in its wake. When a large low pressure system moving in from the sea runs smack dab into a high pressure system over the coast, it’s a recipe for a natural disaster. Counter-clockwise circulating air vacuums up moisture from the Gulf, and all that warm, moist air rising up must eventually come down. And come down it did. “Harvey came inland about 200 miles south of Houston, and the outer rain bands pushed into Houston on Saturday. . . Houston lies a few dozen feet above sea level, and during normal rainfall residential yards drain into streets, streets drain into bayous, and bayous carry water into Galveston Bay and the Gulf of Mexico.

But this was not normal rainfall; it was extreme tropical rainfall. Meteorologists measure rainfall rates in inches per hour at a given location. A rainfall rate of 0.5 inches per hour is heavy, while anything above 2.0 inches per hour is intense (you'd probably stop your car on a highway, pull over, and wait out the passing storm). [In the Houston area], from 11pm to 1am that night, 10.6 inches of rain fell, about as much rainfall as New York City gets from October through December. That happened in two hours.   Ars Technica

 

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